Meeteetse Museum

Meeteetse Museum

The Meeteetse Museum is located behind the Charles Belden Museum of Western Photography, in the area of the building that used to be operated as a service garage. Henry Sayles, Sr. constructed the building between 1916 and 1919 with the intent to house multiple businesses and an office in Meeteetse, including a garage. Thomas Hogg, Sr. leased the service garage and took on as a Husky Bulk Distributor. The service garage was later taken over by his son Thomas “Tommy” Hogg, Jr. who owned and operated the business under the name of the Service Garage and Husky Bulk Plant. According to an advertisement from Thomas Hogg, Jr., the garage offered “the latest in auto repair equipment, parts and accessories”. In October 1949, the garage and neighboring drug store were both robbed. The robbers entered the Service Garage from a window at the front of the building, and stole $25. Adjusted for inflation, this amount would equate to approximately $272 in today’s money.

In September 2001, the Meeteetse Museum and its collections moved out of the Masonic Hall building and into the old service garage building. Both the Meeteetse Museum and the Belden Museum are housed and connected under the same roof.

Meeteetse Museum

Today the Meeteetse Museum immerses visitors in local history. Exhibits include Made in Meeteetse: The Black-Footed Ferret; the Meeteetse Mercantile; National Forest cabin; and the Grand Slam of North American Sheep. Our staff is currently working on an exhibit on wildland fires and an exhibit about Carl Dunrud, owner of the Double Dee Ranch.

Belden Museum | Meeteetse Museum | Bank Museum 

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